Quabbin via Motorcycle

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Around the start of the last century, water shortages in Greater Boston caused the state government to look to Western Massachusetts for supplies of clean drinking water. The Wachusett Reservoir was completed around 1908, and in the Twenties, the people of the Swift River valley lost their battle against eastern Massachusetts, and construction of the Quabbin Reservoir begun. The towns of Enfield, Greenwich, Prescott and Dana were disincorporated, their citizens evicted from their homes, and all structures in the way of the future reservoir razed. Construction took place during the thirties, and the reservoir filled during the forties, becoming the largest inland body of water within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Today, it supplies most of eastern Massachusetts with water. To protect the water, the area around it is a reservation. Yesterday, I took the motorcycle out for a ride around there. The roads around the reservoir are great for motorcycling — curvy, and not too crowded.

I took the fastest route out there, via the Massachusetts Turnpike to Palmer. From there, I took Route 32 north to Route 9, and entered the reservation through the eastern entrance.

My first stop was Hank’s Meadow, a long grassy meadow with a view down to the shoreline. The reservoir is at about 86% capacity right now, so there’s a small band of exposed rocks at the water’s edge.

View from Hank's Meadow

View from Hank’s Meadow

Water's edge at Hank's Meadow

Water’s edge at Hank’s Meadow

From there, I got back on the bike, and headed towards the Enfield Lookout. From the lookout, you can look north out over the reservoir, to where the Town of Enfield used to be.

Sign for the Enfield Lookout

Sign for the Enfield Lookout

Enfield Lookout

Enfield Lookout

View from lookout, before and during construction

View from lookout, before and during construction

What used to be Enfield

What used to be Enfield

From the outlook, I rode to the lookout tower, then past the Winsor Spillway, where excess water is allowed to rejoin the Swift River, parked, and walked up to the Winsor Dam — since the 9/11 attacks, you haven’t been allowed to drive near either the dam or the Goodnough Dike, which impounds the rest of the reservoir.

Quabbin Lookout Tower

Quabbin Lookout Tower and high clouds from the remains of Harvey

Windsor Dam spillway

Windsor Dam spillway

Winsor Dam, which is a high earthen dam impounding the Swift River

Marker for the Dam

Marker for the Dam

I only walked a short distance over the dam; by then it was getting close to 3:30 and I was getting hungry, so I exited the reservation and took Route 9 to 202 south, and had a hamburger and ice cream at a local restaurant. Then I headed back north on 202 towards the actual goal of the ride – the roads around Quabbin.

The roads around the reservoir are great for motorcycling – curvy, scenic, and at least yesterday, not too crowded. They’re also in good condition. From the restaurant, I headed north on 202, past Route 9 where I’d come from (Route 9 in this area is itself a fun, scenic ride – nothing like the honky-tonk of Framingham and Natick), north along the western edge of the reservoir. There are turnouts at various places along the road, but the reservoir is only visible in a few spots along the road. What you mostly see is the woods.

Once I reached Route 122, I turned right onto it, and started heading east. Route 122 is another great road – curvy, little traffic. There are a couple of turnouts that would allow you to hike into what were once Dana and Prescott, but by this point, I wanted to get going. In Barre, I switched onto Route 62 for the ride home. I’d been a little worried about finding it, because the last time I’d been this way I’d gotten a little lost, but I picked it up in the center of Barre without any trouble.

Most of Route 62 is pretty scenic too. It’s a lot hillier than the other roads — there was one long steep downhill, and then a steep uphill. There were also a couple of sections where I got stuck behind someone driving under the speed limit.

Route 62 also runs through a couple of towns; I went through the centers of Hudson and Clinton, and passed along a bike path along the way. As I was exiting Clinton, I saw a big dam up ahead; it was the Wachusett Dam, with Wachusett Reservoir behind it. Of course, I had to stop to look and take a couple of pictures. The dam is tall and imposing, blocking a narrow valley with a narrow river and fountain below, and the reservoir above.

Panorama downstream of the Wachusett Dam

Panorama downstream of the Wachusett Dam

Wachusett Dam

Wachusett Dam

Wachusett Reservoir near dusk

Wachusett Reservoir near dusk

Wachusett Reservoir

Wachusett Reservoir

From Clinton, I followed Route 62 back to Route 2, back to Route 128 and home. All in all, a good day’s ride.

 

Restoration

I was looking through my old negatives to see if I could find the negative of the picture of my Dad that I posted last September, when I came across yet another box of slides. The box contained a bunch of rejected slides, pictures that were either too light or too dark to be part of a slide show. That was then. Now, we can edit pictures digitally, so I figured they were worth a second look. I found about fifteen that looked like they might be worth a quick scan to see if there was anything worth the work of fixing them.

Of the first four, this was the most promising. It’s a picture of my sister and me from 1963, taken by my father.

Nancy and Me - before

Nancy and Me – before

It looks like it was from the tail end of a roll — light fogged at the right and top, and covered with fungus.

Nancy and Me - After

Nancy and Me – After

Not bad at all. So what did I do?

  1. I cropped much of the fogged area out of the picture. (The ‘Before’ picture is actually cropped).
  2. I added an initial overall Curves adjustment to make the darks darker and the lighter areas lighter, and adjust the color.
  3. I added a second Curves adjustment on top of the first, masked with a layer mask with a very soft bottom edge, over the top half of the picture. This layer makes the top part of the picture darker and more contrasty, and further adjusts the colors.
  4. Used the Spot Healing Brush to clean up the biggest bits of dirt on the scan. Things like hairs and especially large clumps of mold.
  5. Cleaned up some (but not anywhere near all) of the mold tendrils on the faces. Just the very largest spots — there was way too much mold damage on this picture to spot them all away individually.
  6. Dealt with the blue mold spots. These occur where the fungus has eaten through the yellow dye layer of the emulsion. For some, like the blue spot on my face, and some of the blue spots on the couch, I used the Clone Stamp Tool. In other places, like along the back wall and the spot in my sister’s hair, it was sufficient to use the Sponge Tool to desaturate the blue away.
  7. I used the Sponge Tool and Burn Tool to desaturate and darken the edge fogging on the right side of the picture.
  8. Finally, I duplicated my layer, ran the Dust and Scratches filter on it, masked it, and then removed the mask away from any edges.

The problem with the Dust and Scratches layer is that it works by blurring the spots away, and can also blur away detail. Usually, I only need to unmask the Dust and Scratches layer where there are dust spots. Usually, if there are particularly bad areas, they’re confined to the sides, which are out of focus anyway. Not this picture. I had to accept this image was not going to be as clean as I’d like.The fungus damage was way too extensive, and covered every square millimeter of the film. So I unmasked everything away from any sort of edge. For example, I unmasked the skin if the faces, but left the edge of the lips and eyes from the base layer showing, to retain the sharpness of the edges.

Overall, though, considering the state of the original image, not too shabby, even if I do say so myself.

 

Bonaire 2016 Pictures: Friday

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This gallery contains 9 photos.

Friday marked the last day of diving. In the morning, Ralph, the Quinnans, Debie and I revisited Aquarius, because of its easy sandy entry. Interestingly enough, possibly due to Barbara making me more aware of them, I saw a ton … Continue reading

Bonaire 2016 Pictures: Thursday

Gallery

This gallery contains 24 photos.

Thursday started with a pair of boat dives. For me, the first one was kind of embarrassing, as I burned through my air and was the first one back on the boat. The second one was actually pretty productive, as … Continue reading